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Comments on On Interviewing as a Junior Dev

Tue, 09 Dec 2014 17:46:36 GMT

Paul Payne
Tue, 09 Dec 2014 17:46:36 GMT

It was fun (and a bit tragic in places) to read your process, Liz. I'm excited to have the opportunity to work with you starting January!

Jonathan Yeong
Tue, 09 Dec 2014 21:39:05 GMT

This was a great read. I remember starting a google spreadsheet to track job leads. But yours is so much more detailed! I think I'll have to shamelessly copy you.

Jennifer Manning
Tue, 09 Dec 2014 23:49:30 GMT

Honestly, I'm currently in the job search and have not had as much fortune as you, but also have approached it differently, so that is my own doing. Reading this initially made me feel like I was doing it all wrong and a total failure, but then it's like something snapped. I re-read it and now feel so motivated to get out there. Thank you and congratulations on the job! I hope you enjoy it there!

julianah
Wed, 10 Dec 2014 22:27:34 GMT

Wow, Liz. You're so damn smart, haha! Congratulations on the new job and way to go on you thorough job hunt. While I'm in a whole different field, I can definitely use some of your pointers in my own search!

Doug Schwartz
Mon, 22 Dec 2014 19:22:22 GMT

Haha, I love the bit about a coding challenge for optimizing the application of makeup. I'll bring that up in my next round of interviewing candidates, just to see the look on the guys' faces. I can just see it now, "John, we pride ourselves on diversity. Our new coding challenge is to determine the optimum order of applying makeup. You have two hours and can use any programming language."

Connie Yau
Thu, 05 Feb 2015 07:47:13 GMT

I enjoyed and felt enlightened after reading about your interview experience. I didn't realise those `Red Flags` occurred in the job hunting process. Glad you found a great place to work in! PS. I am super excited that markdown is supported in the comments. _drool_

Brian Richins
Tue, 07 Jul 2015 22:33:55 GMT

Really good and insightful read, thanks for sharing. I am curious though, after skimming your online resume, why you moved to another company just 2 months after finding and vetting the one indicated in this article? Nobody's business, of course, but I'm curious if there was anything that happened that would add to this great article.

lizmrush
Thu, 09 Jul 2015 04:35:10 GMT

> @brichins > I am curious though, after skimming your online resume, why you moved to another company just 2 months after finding and vetting the one indicated in this article? Unfortunately, shortly after I started at the Lab, Nordstrom went through some changes which you can read about [here on geekwire](http://www.geekwire.com/2015/nordstrom-shrinks-innovation-lab-reassigns-employees-shakeup-tech-intiatives/). Nordstrom, to their credit, did everything they could to hang onto me--I spent a week guest pairing on different teams, from a team working on a project that originated in the Lab to their mobile development team. The truth was that none of those were quite the right fit for me the way the Lab was, so I voluntarily left to pursue an opportunity elsewhere. > @brichins > I'm curious if there was anything that happened that would add to this great article. I think the lesson to be learned from finding a great gig and then having it not work out is that quantity of potential jobs is not the same as quality! Throughout this process I became a better candidate & be tter developer because of all the work I did to figure it out last year--however, the ROI on a three month job hunt no longer makes sense for me. I would recommend it to someone new to tech and looking for their first dev job, but I am happy to say that not only am I fending off the job offers at this point, but now I can be much more strategic and focused when I am looking.

raul-agile
Sun, 02 Aug 2015 11:42:42 GMT

Dear Liz, It came as a real enjoyment reading your article. With almost thirty years in IT - the last fifteen years as Scrum&Agile practitioner (yes, I'm old), mainly as contractor - I had to develop a set of initial questions allowing me to filter my potential employers from the very first contact. The logic of that is the following: when someone asks me to work with them it means they NEED my skills. As such, if they are not open to change, to challenges, to learning new ways of doing their work, than it is pointless to work with them. Even more so when they ask a newly schooled developer to join their ranks: if they are not open to change, challenges, learning and investing in YOUR professional development than it's not worth working with them... At the end of the day, we RENT them our knowhow and potential for solving their problems! As with any rental, there is a <b>duty of care<b> on their sides :) All the best and if you don't find the dream-job you can always START YOUR OWN BUSINESS because your problem solving potential is at healthy levels! Yours sincerely, Rau l PS: Regarding the cultural fit, unfortunately one can not be sure until he jumps into the water and swims along his colleagues - only than one discovers if it is swimming with friends or with sharks :)